Fawnda's Story

I am 56 years old and have struggled with prediabetes for years. I have seen what it can do to family members, so I tried to limit carbs and simple sugars and eat what I thought was healthy. This past May, I was needing clearance from my primary care provider for a microscopic knee surgery. At that visit I was told I was now a full-blown diabetic and needed to consider medication to get it under control. I asked for three months to work on my diet. I read a book by Dr. Joel Fuhrman, “The End of Diabetes," and tried to follow the recipes. Then I heard about a local screening of the new documentary, “Eating You Alive.”

I was hoping for more insight into a plant-based diet and ways to make the transition easier. I also wanted my husband to see it with me, hoping it would open up some discussion about our health issues. I was so encouraged by the testimony of people in the film who had seen significant results in such a short time. My husband was so inspired by the film that he told me the next day he was ready to do this with me...and so began our journey. This was a huge deal to me because he struggles with eating vegetables. But the film is so compelling. Who doesn't want to live a disease-free healthy lifestyle? We have since come into contact with so many people who are there to help and encourage us, such as Dr. Michael Hollie and his monthly “Dinner with the Doctor,” where we sample delicious healthy foods we can make at home and hear his talks on how to live healthier through a whole-food, plant-based (WFPB) diet. The film's website, eatingyoualive.com, has wonderful recipes and encouraging posts, as well.

By last September, after just four weeks on the WFPB diet, my A1C (hemoglobin blood test) had dropped back to the prediabetic range, and today it is normal -- not even prediabetic. Further, my fasting blood sugar levels are stable, which hasn't been the case in years. I've dropped 20 pounds and my husband has lost weight, as well. We both feel so much better and are so thankful that this film is out there to help people like us take charge of our health.

The rates of autism spectrum disorders

The rates of autism spectrum disorders

The rates of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have risen to epidemic levels. In 1981, it was 1 in 10,000. In 2000, it was 1 in 150, and our most recent estimate is 1 in 68. If the current rate of increase continues, half of all children will be considered to have an ASD by the year 2050. A debate has ensued regarding whether the incidence of autism spectrum disorders is falsely elevated because of changes in the way we diagnose these children, or whether there is some environmental factor that is causing an actual real rise in new cases.